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Step inside Kaiwa for a look at some of their delectable offerings, watch Matsugen noodle maker Shingo Chibano roll and cut dough into soba and check out the antipasti at Taormina. (3:32)

One Street: Three Restaurants

Eating our way along Waikiki Beach Walk

Waikiki Beach Walk encompasses eight acres along Lewers Street between Kalakaua and Waikiki Beach. A destination street to eat, play and shop, the Beach Walk features a variety of retail stores, restaurants and hotels. 

Kaiwa

Picture 9When you step into Kaiwa, the first thing that hits you is how gorgeous it is. Beads of water run down an entire side of the restaurant, and as you step toward the back, the floor changes from wood to clear glass over white sand. Look up and the ceiling is red, gold, and white Japanese textiles that seem to float above you.

Could the food be as delicious as the décor is beautiful? Thanks to the adventurous and curious spirit of chef/owners Isamu and Moco Kubota, the answer is a definite yes. A glistening uni and caviar “martini” with a dashi gelee provides delicately nuanced flavors and textures all in one cool, sensual bite. Seafood also comes hot off the teppan, as in the grilled lobster and asparagus with honeyed walnuts.

Kaiwa's beauty draws you in, but it’s the food that holds all your senses captive.

Taormina

Picture 15Across the street from Kaiwa lies another stylish restaurant: Taormina. Both the name and the food are inspired by the seaside town in sunny Sicily. Here in Waikiki, chef Aki Yamamoto prepares contemporary southern Italian food with clear, bright flavors that showcase the seafood on the plate, such as the grilled tuna, dressed simply in an herb oil. But Yamamoto's talents aren't limited to the savory; the homemade cannoli is a sweet, perfect ending at Taormina.

Matsugen

One street over, behind Waikiki Beach Walk, Matsugen gets back to basics with freshly made soba, Japanese buckwheat noodles. Picture 16-1At Matsugen, soba is made fresh--from grinding the buckwheat to rolling thin sheets of dough to cutting the precise, thin strands that ultimately end up in your bowl. You can choose a variety of accompaniments, but the true perfection of these noodles lies in their simplicity.

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Comments from Readers

  1. 1ba2326b4bbfa2eeef2a977c4692dece
    Elaine - The Gourmet Girl on 6/12/2009 at 1:50pm

    Video is great, it was fun to see the hotel that I stayed at when I visited Waikiki Beach.
    Our meal at Taormina is one my mom and I still talk about.
    Thanks for posting it!



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